There is one major habit that a shooter can form that will greatly increase their overall accuracy with a firearm. This works for pistols and rifles equally. Many shooters release the trigger completely after firing. This allows the trigger to move all the way forward before the next shot and therefore increases the distance that it has to be pulled back through in order to fire again. The longer the trigger pull, the more chance there is that the shooter is going to involuntarily move the gun in some manner before it goes off, in turn, making their shot less accurate. The goal anytime we shoot is to pull the trigger in a smooth and controlled way that does not induce movement. By limiting the amount of distance that we have to pull the trigger, we can limit the chance of an errant shot.

A proper trigger pull is brought straight back, no jerking, no side to side movement, and surprises the shooter when the gun goes off.  Then it is held back in the fired position; it is not released immediately. After the gun is back on target, the shooter should slowly, in a controlled manner, release the trigger little by little until it resets. In most guns the shooter can feel the reset or even hear it with an audible click. When this reset takes place, the gun is now ready to fire again with no “over travel.” Over travel is the extra distance that the trigger needs to be pulled before it gets to the point that it fires. If the trigger is reset as discussed above, then there is little movement needed to fire the gun again. As stated, the less movement needed to fire, the less chance that an errant movement is created and throws the shot off. This process needs to be repeated after every shot. Pull, fire, hold, reset… pull, fire, hold, reset.

Practice this follow through and reset until it is absolute habit. Once it is, you can start to increase the speed that you use to go through the process. With an experienced shooter, by standers aren’t able to tell that the shooter is going through these steps.